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Enabling Nigerian firms to become export ready

Against a backdrop of falling oil prices, the Nigerian government has woken up to its economic vulnerability to oil-related disruptions. This underscores the need for diversification to non-oil exports. PDF Bridge supported the drive towards growing non-oil export by supporting under-represented non-oil exporters through three strands of work: strengthening Nigeria’s ability to trade beyond its borders through the Network of Practicing Non-Oil Exporters of Nigeria (NPNEN), an export mentorship programme, which links experienced exporters with new and growing export businesses; and training sessions for micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) intending to export non-oil goods were held on; Market Entry Strategies, Understanding export documentation, Raising Finance for Export, Branding, and packaging for export. In addition, Roundtables were held on;

  • Addressing Barriers to Access to Foreign Markets – An analysis of Spices & Herbs, Textiles & Garments, and Leather Products;
  • Analysis and Impact of Export Expansion Grant on Export Potential, Market Access and Export Competitiveness in Nigeria;
  • Improving Market Access through Digital Trade and;
  • Analysis of Potentials of Nigeria’s Services Sector for Economic Diversification, Employment and Foreign Trade;
  • Diversification and Non-oil Export Opportunities for Nigeria States Post-COVID19 Study

Exploring Export Business Opportunities in the Post COVID Era

The Network of Practicing Non-Oil Exporters of Nigeria (NPNEN) collaborated with PDF Bridge to bring a 90-minutes training on ‘Exploring Export Business Opportunities in the Post-COVID Era’. This training was delivered by Mr. Bamidele Ayemibo, a trustee of NPEN and an International Trade Expert.

In this assessment, examination of the intermediate channels suggests that the main effect of the program is enabling firms to buy more capital and hire more workers, with little impact on business practices, mentoring or networking.

Improving Nigeria’s Non-oil Exports: Aba Industrial City

Aba Industrial City is an aggregation of thousands of MSMEs and mass producers of industrial goods including garment and leather products. If properly harnessed, the mass production capacities of component clusters of AIC and similar models are capable of positioning Nigeria at a competitive advantage in the global garment and leather industrial space. In 2016, the Textile, Apparel, and Footwear sector contributed N2 trillion ($6.6 billion), approximately 2% of Nigeria’s total GDP, to Nigeria’s economy.

Improving Trade Policies in Nigeria

Crude oil prices took a deep plunge in April 2020 with Brent Crude dropping below $20 per barrel. With the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and crashing oil prices, the need for Nigeria to be less reliant on oil becomes more glaring. The Policy Development Facility Bridge programme’s Trade Policy Workstream (TRD) has been supporting the growth of the non-oil export sector since its predecessor programme Policy Development Facility II (PDF II). The support is a two-pronged approach that is targeted at increasing the number of export-ready MSMEs in the non-oil export trade. This approach explores enabling the identified underrepresented export-oriented voices in economic policy and strengthening the sustainable participation of exporter groups. Listen to the changes that have occurred.

Increasing audit capacities

Ismail Adeleye, Reform Adviser to the Auditor General for the Federation, discusses his efforts to increase the government’s audit capacity and support Nigeria’s Public Accounts Committee.

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