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PDF II held a two-day capacity building training themed: “Capacity Building for Banks and DFIs”. This is designed to explore access to finance challenges, awareness campaigns, and opportunities that non-oil exporters face with banks in accessing finance. The capacity building covered topics such as Export Industry Regulations and Documentations, payment methods and trade finance instruments, Handling export finance options, managing export risks, understanding the franchising potential etc.

Capacity Building for Trade Associations

Trade Associations play a role in promoting appropriate policies, regulations, and necessary reforms relating to their sector of operations. They create opportunities for networking and consultations among industry players as well as being a voice when it comes to new regulations and legislations while encouraging best practices among its members. According to Peter Gomersall[1], trade associations exist to support their members and further their interests, to defend them when they are under threats and to promote a common position on issues affecting the environment in which they operate.

Given the foregoing, the PDF Bridge Trade Policy Workstream organised a two-day capacity-building session targeted at strengthening the leadership of non-oil export-related trade associations and improve on their business strategy to position them to take advantage of the opportunities in the non-oil export value chain. The sessions had in attendance delegates from government agencies such as FMITI, NAQS, FMARD, NOTN, CBN as well as executives of trade group drawn from various industries including agricultural commodities farmers, agricultural commodities exchange and aggregators, industrialists, agro-processors, women, and youth development groups, textile and apparel among other participants.

[1] https://www.iiste.org/Journals/index.php/JEDS/article/download/7852/8030

Capacity Building for Trade Associations (Day 2)

Trade Associations play a role in promoting appropriate policies, regulations, and necessary reforms relating to their sector of operations. They create opportunities for networking and consultations among industry players as well as being a voice when it comes to new regulations and legislations while encouraging best practices among its members. According to Peter Gomersall[1], trade associations exist to support their members and further their interests, to defend them when they are under threats and to promote a common position on issues affecting the environment in which they operate.

Given the foregoing, the PDF Bridge Trade Policy Workstream organised a two-day capacity-building session targeted at strengthening the leadership of non-oil export-related trade associations and improve on their business strategy to position them to take advantage of the opportunities in the non-oil export value chain. The sessions had in attendance delegates from government agencies such as FMITI, NAQS, FMARD, NOTN, CBN as well as executives of trade group drawn from various industries including agricultural commodities farmers, agricultural commodities exchange and aggregators, industrialists, agro-processors, women, and youth development groups, textile and apparel among other participants.

[1] https://www.iiste.org/Journals/index.php/JEDS/article/download/7852/8030

 Here is a link to Day 1 of the training.

CBN forex dialogue report (I)

In June 2015 the Central Bank of Nigeria restricted the sale of foreign currency for the purchase of certain items following a slump in government revenue resulting from a decline in crude oil prices. The decision aimed to conserve foreign reserves, facilitate the resuscitation of domestic industries and improve employment generation, but proved unpopular, particularly due to its unintended impact on small businesses.

Against this background, the Central Bank of Nigeria forex policy dialogue was held in September 2015 to examine the impact of the foreign exchange policy on small and medium-sized businesses and citizens, gain a better understanding of the bank’s plans and seek alternatives and next steps. This event report sums up the key messages to emerge from the dialogue.

Developing inclusive trade policies

Titilope Ojo, Lead for the Trade Policy Workstream, discusses her role in the development of inclusive trade policies that reflected the demands and needs of previously marginalised voices.

Diversifying towards non-oil exports in Nigeria

The study ‘Diversification and Non-Oil Export Opportunities for Nigerian States Post-COVID-19’ was commissioned by the NEPC through the Policy Development Facility (PDF) Bridge Programme for use by the public and private sector stakeholders. Ernst & Young conducted a market analysis on six prioritised products from the Zero Oil Initiative and provided strategic recommendations.

PDF Bridge has now developed a policy brief for stakeholders to highlight the key issues and recommendations. The full study can be accessed here.

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